PUBLISHED PAPERS PROGRAM

The American Association of Professional Farriers (AAPF) has created a new program to encourage farriers and farriers who work collaboratively with their veterinarians to document and promote their work through the creation of case studies and instructional articles. The complete program will be known as the "AAPF Published Papers Program" (PPP).

AAPF members (who have achieved the Accredited Professional Farrier (APF) status) will be asked to register their proposal with the association then begin the process of collecting data (including images, illustrations, videos and references) for case studies. Alternatively, members may submit instructional articles which are defined as short "How-To" papers allowing members to share their techniques, ideas and/or suggestions with other farriers, veterinarians or other equine enthusiasts. Case studies are defined as a more in-depth analysis of a situation stressing developing factors over a period of time, the farriery and a conclusion.

Once a case study is complete it can be submitted to the AAPF for review. Support Panels will be created to evaluate the case studies. All case studies submitted for review to the case study support panels will be done anonymously. Initially, the case study support panels will be made up of current AAPF members who have also earned a designation with the Worshipful Company of Farriers or possibly a few veterinarians who have an expertise in farriery. Eventually the initial panel members will be replaced with members who have had their studies approved by the case study support panel.

According to Roy Bloom APF CJF, chairman of the AAPF Published Papers Committee, "Subject matter for case studies and instructional articles is limited only by the thought process of the submitting members."

Members who have their case studies approved by the case study support panel will earn the designation of "Accredited Professional Farrier Published" (APFP). Similarly, those whose instructional articles are approved will earn the same designation.

The AAPF will publish all approved case studies on their website and will work with other equine publications (based upon the topic of the case study) to have the case studies printed in other publications and websites.

A critique sheet used by the Case Study Support Panels is also included. Authors should work with the critique sheet when writing their case studies.

Click here for the "Published Papers Program Standard Operating Procedures & Guidelines" (also available by scrolling down on this page)

Click here for the Critique Sheet used by the authors and the Case Study Support Panels

Click here to register your idea for a Case Study or Instructional Article with the AAPF

 


Committee Chairman: Roy Bloom APF CJF
   
Committee Vice Chairman:



 
 
Committee Members:
  • Dave Farley APF CF
  • Steve Prescott APF CJF

 



STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES & GUIDELINES FOR PUBLISHED PAPERS PROGRAM

 


1. Purpose

a. Encourage farriers to document their work by creating case studies and instructional articles.

b. Educate public, professional and other alliances to recognize and support the work of AAPF farriers.

c. Promote the completed case studies and instructional articles to external publications and websites for printing.

2. Scope

a. Recognize farriers experience, education and commitment to the public and professional sectors of the equine industry.

b. Develop criteria which all case studies and instructional articles will include.

3. Baselines

a. To submit a case study or instructional article, the farrier must be:
i. An AAPF member in good standing, and
ii. Obtained the level of Accredited Professional Farrier (APF).

4. Definitions

a. Published Paper:  Collectively all case studies and instructional articles written by AAPF members which are published by the AAPF.

b. Case Study:  An analysis of a situation stressing developmental factors over time.  Case Studies must be thoroughly descripted.  May include photos and/or videos to substantiate findings.

c. Instructional Article:  A step-by-step report on the process for the creation of a product or service.  The Instructional Article must be thoroughly descriptive.  May include photos and/or videos to substantiate process(es). 

d. Case Study Research:  Can include single or multiple cases, can include quantitative evidence, rely on multiple sources of evidence, and benefit from the prior development of theoretical propositions.

e. Case Study Support Panel:  Initially comprised of AAPF members who are held in high regard in the shoeing of any breed and/or discipline.  The Case Study Support Panel will initially consist of five (5) members.  Once a farrier obtains an approved Published Paper, he/she will become eligible to become a member of the Case Study Support Panel for the breed and/or discipline for which he/she has submitted the Published Paper.  The initial five (5) members will “rotate off” the respective panels once members who have submitted Published Papers become members of the panels.  There shall be no limit as to the members on the Case Study Support Panel.

f. Accredited Professional Farrier Published (APFP):  Once an AAPF Accredited Professional Farrier has submitted a Case Study or Instructional Article and is published by the AAPF and/or other public, professional or other alliances their Accredited Professional Farrier (APF) status shall be changed to:  Accredited Professional Farrier Published (PAPF).

5. AAPF Continuing Education Credits

a. The author of either approved Case Studies or Educational Articles will receive up to 16 AAPF CE credits.  Determination of credits to be made by the AAPF Continuing Education Committee.

6. Structuring a Case Study

a. Submit an Idea:  The title and a synopsis of the Case Study shall be submitted along with an application form containing name, address, city, state/province, country, phone, and email address.  Once a farrier has submitted an idea, the information will be recorded by the AAPF office.  All information shall remain confidential.  However, should a similar idea be submitted, both (or all) farriers shall be contacted and advised that another farrier is working on a similar topic.  Should all parties agree, contact information may be exchanged between the parties.

b. Case Study Submission Format:  Create and submit your Case Study as a Microsoft Word document.  The submission of images, graphics and videos is highly encouraged.  The AAPF office will work with Case Study writers in the submission of Case Studies.

7. Structuring an Instructional Article

a. Submit an Idea:  The title and a synopsis of the Instructional Article shall be submitted along with an application form containing name, address, city, state/province, country, phone, and email address.  Once a farrier has submitted an idea, the information will be recorded by the AAPF office.  All information shall remain confidential.  However, should a similar idea be submitted, both (or all) farriers shall be contacted and advised that another farrier is working on a similar topic.  Should all parties agree, contact information may be exchanged between the respective parties.

b. Section of an Instructional Article:  Typically an Instructional Article will offer a “How-to” description of a product or service.  These How-to articles should be clear, concise and fully descriptive.  Images should be included which fully describe the steps involved.

c. Instructional Article Submission Format:  Create and submit your Instructional Article as a Microsoft Word document.  The submission of images, graphics and videos is highly encouraged.  The AAPF office will work with Instructional Article writers in the submission of Instructional Articles.

8. Process of Submitting a Case Study

a. AAPF members should notify the AAPF office of their intent to begin the process of developing a Case Study.  A form will be provided on the AAPF website for members to complete and submit. 

b. The AAPF office will acknowledge the submission of the intent form.  The intent will be recorded in the AAPF database. 

c. The farrier should then begin the process of gathering information for the Case Study.

d. Once the Case Study is complete it should be submitted to the AAPF office.  The office staff will assist the farrier in the submission of a “complete” Case Study which includes images, graphics and videos which substantiate the findings of the Case Study.

e. AAPF office staff will disseminate copies of the completed Case Study to the Case Study Support Panel.  Prior to disseminating, staff will work to remove or cover any distinguishing references (farrier name, etc.) from the Case Study.

f. The Case Study Support Panel will be provided with a Critique Sheet that conforms to the requirements established in these guidelines.  The last question on the Critique Sheet will be to determine if the Case Study is approved or not.  A simple majority vote of the Panel will determine if the Case Study is approved. 

g. If the Case Study is not approved by the majority of the Panel, the critique sheets will be sent to the author of the Case Study so improvements can be made prior to resubmission of the Case Study.  All Critique Sheets will also be anonymous to the candidate (i.e. the names of the Case Study Support Panel critiquing a specific Case Study).  The complete list of members of the Case Study Support Panel will be made public.

h. Authors will sign an authorization which allows the AAPF to arrange to have all approved Case Studies printed in publications (farrier and non-farrier) and websites (farrier and non-farrier).  The author shall receive full recognition for their work in said publications and media venues. 

i. Case Studies shall be connected to the author’s membership profile on the AAPF website/database.  Additionally, they shall be searchable on the website.

9. Process of Submitting an Instructional Article

a. AAPF members should notify the AAPF office of their intent to begin the process of developing an Instructional Article.  A form will be provided on the AAPF website for members to complete and submit. 

b. The AAPF office will acknowledge the submission of the intent form.  The intent will be recorded in the AAPF database. 

c. The farrier should then begin the process of writing the Instructional Article

d. Once the Instructional Article is complete it should be submitted to the AAPF office.  The office staff will assist the farrier in the submission of a “complete” Instructional Article which includes images and graphics which complements the descriptions included in the article.

e. AAPF office staff will forward copies of the completed Instructional Article to the Public Relations/Communications Committee for their review.  This committee will work directly with the author to prepare the article for publication.

f. Authors will sign a waiver which allows the AAPF to arrange to have all approved Instructional Articles printed in publications (farrier and non-farrier) and websites (farrier and non-farrier).  The author shall receive full recognition for their work in said publications and media venues. 

g. Instructional Articles shall be connected to the author’s membership profile on the AAPF website/database.  Additionally, they shall be searchable on the website.

10. General Instructions for Authors of Case Studies and Instructional Articles

a. The AAPF Published Papers Program is protected by copyright and information submitted and accepted becomes the property of American Association of Professional Farriers (AAPF).  AAPF reserves the right not to accept any submission without further recourse.

Submissions may include case studies with follow-up data, or the results of experimental or observational studies as shoeing cases, as well as "How to" and review papers.  Approval will be made by the Case Study Support or PR/Communications Committees.  Missing data or proposed, but not completed procedures, will exclude the submission from consideration until corrections are made by the author.  AAPF invites information dealing with any subject germane to trimming or shoeing, but special consideration will be given to submissions by farriers and material with practical content or new information.

All submissions should strictly adhere to these Instructions for Authors and will be reviewed by the Case Study Support Panel.

Authors are expected to acknowledge all sources of funding or support for the work described and to disclose to the Case Study Support Panel any financial interest (including ownership, employment, consultancy arrangements, or service as an officer or board member) they have with companies that manufacture or sell products that figure prominently in the paper or with companies that manufacture or sell competing products.  Such an interest will not necessarily influence the decision to accept or reject a submission for the program, but must be included in the Acknowledgments section.

b. Guidelines:

Failure to adhere to the following format will result in being asked to rewrite or replace or add what is missing.  It is the author's responsibility to convince the Case Study Support Panel of the value of the submission, as well as to portray to the reader the contents of the presentation.

Headings should include (but are not limited to) the following:

1. Title:
- The title should be 15 words or fewer, at the top and on the first page.
Example:
“Navicular Findings on Wedging the Heels”

2. Take Home Message
- This should be a short, concise summarization of the main conclusion and should be no longer than two or three sentences (approximately 50 words). Instructional Articles ("How to" papers) do not require a Take-Home Message.
Example:
Wedging the heels higher than five degrees of the angel of the pastern was determined to provide negative results.

3. Introduction
- The rationale for the submission should be given briefly and significant published work acknowledged here.  The clinical significance should also be included, as well as a clear statement of the objective or purpose of the submission.  The statement of objectives is usually found in the last sentence of the Introduction.

4. Materials and Methods
- This section should describe experimental (materials) shoes and shoeing used in the case or cases as well as a description of why the equine was selected for the case study.  It should also include the breed, age, description of conformation type, what the equine was used for and the environment it was living in.

- Data obtained and how they were obtained must be described.  A description of the statistical methods used to summarize data, test hypotheses, and characterize the significance of results should also be included.

5. Results
- Actual results with numbers and data must be presented.  If the data can be well represented with a graph or figure, these are encouraged. 

6. Discussion
- Important findings documented in the results of the case study should be stated.  Results should be related to other work which has been done and how the results differ or agree with previously published work and why any differences may have occurred should be discussed.  The practical take home message for the farrier should be clearly defined and stated in the summarizing final statement.  This statement may be longer, but should be similar in content to the take home message at the beginning of the paper.

7. References
- All submissions must include references.  References to published works should be limited to what is relevant and necessary.  Number references in the text with superscript numbers consecutively in the order in which they are first cited.  Under references, list all authors when there are three or fewer; list only the first three and add "et al." when there are four or more.  The author is responsible for the formatting and accuracy of all reference citations.  Since readers frequently depend upon the reference citations to guide them in further reading, it is imperative that the citations are correct so that libraries can locate the papers a reader may wish to obtain.

Examples:
i. Journal Article:

Farley Dave. Internal Fixation. American Farriers Journal (AFJ) July 2011: 86 – 88.

ii. Book:

Colles Chris, Ware Ron.. The Principles of Farriery. London: J.A. Allen, 2010: 51 – 53.

iii. Other Media:

Bloom Roy, Farley Dave.  DVD:  Fundamentals of Forging,
Volume 2.  Hot Iron Productions, 2009.

iv. Footnotes:

References to dissertations, theses, abstracts, personal communications and papers submitted but not yet accepted for publication should be footnoted:

Jones CD. The selective advantage of the ABO blood groups [thesis]. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University; 1990.

Bramlage LR. Lexington, KY. (personal communication) 1996.

Smith AB. Unpublished data. January 1990.

Evans LH. Entrapment of the epiglottis. Am Assoc Equine Pract. In Press 1981.

8. Products and Equipment
- Products and equipment should be identified by proper or generic names or descriptions.

All products should be footnoted, along with the manufacturer's full address.  A trade name may be included in a lettered footnote along with the name and location (full mailing address including zip code) of the manufacturer when the product or equipment was essential to the outcome of the experiment or treatment.

Example:
All horses were shod with Kerckhaert 10 mm x 22 mm DF shoes and hooves were packed with Vettec Equi-Pak CS.

DF Horseshoes:  Royal Kerckhaert Horseshoe Company, Vogelwaarde, The Netherlands   www.kerckhaert.com

Equi-Pak with Copper Sulfate:  Vettec, Inc., Oxnard, CA 93033 
www.vettec.com

9. Acknowledgments:

- Acknowledgments should include financial and material support for research (e.g. Grayson Research Foundation, AAEP Research Foundation) and technical support for work performed.

10. Permissions:

- If you wish to use previously published material, including text, photographs, or drawings, you must acknowledge the original source and submit written permission from the copyright holders (author and publisher) to reproduce the material.  Provide this permission when you submit your original papers.

11. Ethical Considerations:

- Authors are expected to disclose the nature of any financial interests they have with companies that manufacture or sell products that figure prominently in the submission or with companies that manufacture or sell competing products.  (This includes ownership, employment, consultancy arrangements, or service as an officer or board member.)

All submissions should cite exact materials used in their cases.

c. Review Process:

To respect the integrity of the AAPF Published Papers Program and ensure the fairness of the review process, AAPF has adopted blind reviewing in which the identity of the authors and reviewers are not known to each other.  Papers will be reviewed by the Case Study Support Panel.

d. Acceptance Criteria for Published Papers Program:

One goal of the Published Paper Program (PPP) in choosing submissions for the AAPF is to find available case studies by Farriers and Veterinarians with experience and expertise to meet the needs of our clients.

e. Mentors for Authors:

Paper submissions by farriers and veterinarians and first time authors are highly encouraged.  The AAPF website (www.ProfessionalFarriers.com) will feature a list of members in various areas of expertise that have agreed to volunteer their time to mentor an author who needs guidance.

 
For additional details or questions, please call 859-533-1465 or email aapf@professionalfarriers.com